sourdough

Every day I care for a sourdough culture that I started a couple of weeks ago. I feed it half a cup of rye flour and water, sometimes pouring off some to make room. First it sat near the wood stove and I fed it twice a day, then it moved into the kitchen, to a cosy spot where I won’t forget it. Beside the kettle. It makes a resounding pop when I open the seal, the bubbles are tremendous, and it grows significantly each day. Seeing that it was more mature and hearty than a previous attempt, I thought I’d give it a crack at raising a few loaves.

I love that sourdough culture forms from wild yeasts, it is much easier on our digestion. We’re also sensitive to wheat, so this bread is made from spelt. I’ve been reading the Bread handbook by Daniel Stevens, which is an intense pleasure all by itself and very distracting. Flatbreads! Croissants!… oh yes, and Spelt Sourdough, hurrah. Before bed, as I was told to, I mixed up the sponge and put it near the stove for the night.

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In the morning it looked like bubbly soup, but when I measured in the flour and mixed that in, I was amazed to find it became a dough. Following some good advice, I left it to rest for 10 minutes before adding the salt, which I did. Scientific reasons, you see.

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Flour, salt, a glug of olive oil, mixed about;

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Turned out and kneaded. A lot, (or perhaps not) as spelt has lower gluten. I am so glad that I learned to knead at River Cottage! The Bread handbook has great illustrations of this technique. Mine are provided by my small child;

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And by my tall child, made far taller by a handy stool. What a pleasure it is to knead the dough, I’m in love.

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I formed the dough into a tight round and put it near the wood stove to proof for an hour, repeated this a few times; it got lighter and lighter; then finally made it into three boules, dusted with flour and put into linens. I later discovered that the bowls I had them in made them too humid; suddenly proofing baskets sound very good. From here I left them to double, which they sort of did.

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Baking the sourdough was quite dramatic. I have tried a no-knead bread recipe, which has a wonderful technique of cooking in a good pot, but I just had to try this way, using a hot pan with a water bath below it. Only I had no roasting tin for the boiling water and used a ceramic piece, which promptly cracked in two. Oh dear! I had reserved two of the boules to rise a bit longer, and tried my muffin tin in its stead on those two; much better. We did try hard to wait for that first loaf to cool, before eating all of it. Gorgeous.

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