bunting

Something about bunting is so joyful. I love garlands and pennants and flags. I spent some time gathering beautiful fabrics to make quilts and bunting for our children when they first had their own bedroom together. I sewed it in time for a birthday party, when we were living in London.

bunting-party © elisa rathje 2011

Just the thing for a little girl’s old fashioned tea party, with elderflower cordial, scones with jam devonshire cream, a sparkling raspberry jelly, and faerie cakes.
bunting © elisa rathje 2011
Gather lots of fabric, and a very long length of ribbon or bias tape. I cut a paper triangle the size and shape I wanted, folded the fabric in half, right sides together, then pinned the triangle with one edge along the fold. Keep in mind the pattern of the fabric and arrange how it will lie before you fold. Cut it out.
bunting © elisa rathje 2011
Jovial shapes and merry patterns! I sewed along the cut side, clipped the tip of the triangle a little, and turned it, making sure to gently poke that tip cleanly with a knitting needle. You can sew along the the folded side as well to give it definition, if you like, but I don’t see the difference unless I’m right up close.
bunting © elisa rathje 2011
Press them flat with lots of heat and steam. Such cheerful things, I think.
bunting © elisa rathje 2011
First decide on a pleasing arrangement of the flags. I like the fabrics to pick up on colours or patterns in their neighbours. Theme and variation. Pin them along some ribbon with a lengthwise fold, or some bias tape, so that the raw edge of the flag is tucked into the fold. I used a white sateen ribbon, to blend just a little into the girls’ white room, though I’ve also seen linen ribbon used to great effect. Best to measure this to keep things consistent, once you see what kind of distance looks best to you. I liked a slightly smaller width than the flags themselves. Sew along this ribbon, catching each flag as you close the fold. That’s it!
bunting © elisa rathje 2011

<

p>The bunting looks awfully sweet in their little cottage gable room (so extraordinarily little, it isn’t so easy to get a picture of it!). Every time I find new fabric I’m tempted to reserve some for a few more flags.

Related Posts