studio & shop

Thanks to all who came to the open studio! I am so looking forward to seeing you again at classes starting up. Here’s a peek round the Decemberish shop.

milk painted shop hutch

So nice to fill up the milk-painted shopkeeper’s cabinet with useful things and my traditional skills studies & kits.

kits and pottery

The pottery from my autumn return to the wheel has arrived. I’ll show you more closely soon.

long and elegant kit, with creamer

antique singer

The handcrank, star of the old school quilting tutorial movies, has pride of place.

hand-thrown candlesticks

You can still get the patterns (sorry, the kits are all sold out!) as a gift to someone who’d love to learn a traditional skill. The movies in the sidebar to the left guide every kit and pattern.

studiocorner

More detail of some of the things I’ve been making, here. I’m so pleased with the new white glaze.

open studio

Come to appleturnover’s first open studio! Meet me at the lake this Sunday, December 1st, 2013, anytime from 1 until 4. All details are here. Have a cup of tea, warm up by the fire and learn to make a willow ornament. Catch an early bird sign up for New Year workshops and pick out your favourite traditional skills kit or one of my handmade tried & trues, well in time for the holidays.

studio on the lake ©2013 elisa rathje

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p>I hope to see you! (Are you far, far away? Get appleturnover’s letter, the postcards, for a specials in the online shop.) I’m looking forward to showing you what I’ve been making lately.

raking leaves

Raking leaves is a chore transformed to a simple pleasure, these days. What is that shift that comes with even the palest sense of ownership? To want to nurture the garden, assist in its beauty and richness.

raking leaves

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p>Now I rake with great joy in the physical work, pleased by the change from a patterned lawn to a clear one. Oh! How good to begin to settle into seasonal tasks. I rake up leaves to mulch round plants and protect beds of soil from drumming rains, to repress weeds, to layer with kitchen scraps and enrich our compost for next year’s vegetables. I’m amazed to find myself wishing for more leaves to produce leaf mould. In the rocky highlands the soil is thin, so I’m greedy for earth. Waves of red and gold drop from the trees along the lake, and my arms grow tired and recover in time for the next wave. I like to think of the first old gardener here, doing the same. When the trees are bare, the garden will be cosily put to bed.

antique seed case

Deep in projects for the winter fair, I thought I would wade over to make a photograph of the antique seed case for you. Just now I am playing about with objects in it, little sewing kits and other useful old fashioned things.

antique case

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p>I found this old seed display case on the island this summer, and thought it would be just fine for small pieces in my little studio shop. Having migrated from Minnesota to Ontario, then travelled to the Pacific, it now lives in our island cottage opposite the cabinet that I reworked and repainted. It is quite charmingly handmade, beautiful without a thing in it. I shall pack it up, quite full of things in it, this weekend, and take it up the hill to my table at sunday’s local winter fair. If you’re around Victoria, do come by for hot apple cider and good handcrafted things.

carding wool

We’ve had a series of early autumn afternoons that were just right for sitting out on the porch, drenched in pale sunshine, and doing some handwork. I’ve been carding wool.

carding wool

This is a bit of local fleece, already washed by a friend. It’s full of woody bits, so carding outside is perfect as it sends them flying. I love the action of pulling at the fibres, with the carders brushing in opposite directions, large arm movements and strong ones. The sound! Therapeutic. And a workout, the pleasing, destructive-productive kind, like wedging clay or hammering hot iron. Then small movements, with the carders paired handle-to-handle, to roll up the fibre again, all clean and brushed out in beautiful alignment, ready to spin, or full, or needle-felt, or stuff into some kind of wonderfully useful thing, which is what I’m doing with it. Speaking of ready to spin, I’ve set up the old spinning wheel I’d brought from England, I want to show you very soon.

You might like to read about our experiments in dyeing wool with plants, too.