saddle stitch binding

The printed guides to good old fashioned patchwork quilting are the trusty companions to appleturnover’s old school movies. They’re great to refer to as you work on your project, especially if you haven’t always got the movie in front of you. I adore bookbinding and it is a pleasure to make these little booklets to go in every quilting kit. Let me show you saddle stitch binding.

printed guides © elisa rathje 2012

The booklets are printed with petite black & white stills, accompanied by detailed text to consult as you need to. I like to work from both the moving image and the still when I’m learning a new skill, do you?

quiltguide1s.jpg

I laid the images and text out, and had them printed at an excellent, environmentally sound old printshop in Vancouver, where I could get fully recycled, certified papers. Binding them was a little trickier, as I don’t have a long-reach saddle stitch stapler, though I hunted for one. In the end I discovered Paul Tseng’s brilliantly simple solution and followed it as closely as I could.

After folding the signatures (using my imaginary bone folder – wish, wish!), I clipped the pages in place and gently pressed a stapler into the spine of the booklet just enough to mark two spots. Now, find a sturdy, sharp needle. An awl would be better still. (Wish, wish.)

printed quilting guides © elisa rathje 2012

Gently puncture the pages through;

printed quilting guides © elisa rathje 2012

Til you’ve got clean holes to work with.

printed quilting guides © elisa rathje 2012

Saddle-stitchis standard for booklets, requiring no more than a few staples into the centerfold. Paul’s simple solution is to insert the staple by hand, and press it shut. Of course! So smart.

printed quilting guides © elisa rathje 2012

I pressed the booklets a little, and they were complete. There’s the pocket guide to Quilting Squares, a traditional “nine-patch” patchwork quilt, and Quilting Triangles, a traditional “broken dishes” patchwork quilt.

printed quilting guides © elisa rathje 2012

quilted quilt

Oh, I’m thrilled to finally have finished a nine-patch quilt. All patchwork, all piecing, all quilting, all binding finished today. It only took me three and a half years.

patchwork quilt © elisa rathje 2012

With a few interruptions. (Alright, interruptions like going to Canada for months, or working on seventeen other projects in between – don’t worry, it really needn’t take three years!) A second one is nearly done, so my children will each have a quilt.

patchwork quilt © elisa rathje 2012

I’m always delighted to complete a project. It looks just right with the bunting in their little room up in the cottage gable. I’m so pleased.

bookbinding

After drinking tea and cordial, eating jellies and faerie cakes and little sandwiches at the birthday tea party, we settled into a bit of bookbinding.

bookbinding © elisa rathje 2011

My children are very fond of bookmaking and often appear at my elbow with a stack of papers. I thought it would be lovely to try sewing several signatures together in a traditional way. The roomful of children was a cacophony of threading needles and punching holes, the elder ones helping the younger.

bookbinding © elisa rathje 2011

We kept the cover very basic and simply glued some heavy patterned paper to the outer pages, and then sliced three sides to open the folded pages and clean up the whole book nicely. We’d punched some placecards for the table, using calligraphy to write everyone’s names; many of the children pasted theirs somewhere in or on their books. They turned out very well! Wonderful to see how everyone set to embellishing their book, filling it with drawings or stories, collage, deciding immediately what they’d use it for. Their effortless creativity is astonishing to witness.