papermaking

Making paper is such simple pleasure. A little circle of friends made some together today. We began, like bread bakers, a day or two in advance, ripping a dozen sheets of paper into small pieces and leaving it to soak in a few cups of water. One family cooked theirs up and spun it through the food processor to get a fine pulp; the others just rubbed the soaked paper for a few minutes, til the fibres came apart, to make a rough, porridgey texture.

papermaking-screen

You’ll need a screen. We had ready-made screens and homemade screens. An embroidery hoop with a pair of fine tights stretched across it works surprisingly well. You’ll also need a tub wide enough to accomodate the screens, and for good measure, a bit of mesh and a sponge to help press the water out.

papermaking-flowers

The children ran round the garden collecting flowers and leaves to add to the paper;

papermaking © elisa rathje 2012

Plucked the petals from their stems and threw it all into the mixture in the tub, with a bit of extra water.

papermaking © elisa rathje 2012

Ready? Here we go. Slip the screen (screen-side-up) under the pulp, and lift it up to catch a layer of paper. If you don’t like the effect, tap it out and try again.

papermaking © elisa rathje 2012

If you choose to, lay the mesh over the pulp on your screen, and press gently with the sponge to release water, frequently squeezing out the sponge. I’m not sure it is necessary, but we admired the look of it after.

papermaking © elisa rathje 2012

Set the papermaking screen somewhere warm to dry for a few hours. It’s far too miserable to leave ours outside, sadly. We’ll pry up our homemade paper with a butter knife, and show you later!

pitcher

Although I have several projects on the verge, none are quite finished to show you. Boat-building is almost done, and I was delighted to get the proper foot for free-motion quilting on my antique singer. A few ceramic pieces have been bisque fired, but must wait through the spring break to be glazed. Even the earth seems to be just bursting, almost there, tiny green leaves dotting the hedges. So, an almost-finished project.

homemade jug © elisa rathje 2012

I may have shown you my first jug, I’m ever so proud of throwing this one. I love it for wooden spoons but I may swap them for daffodils now that the hundred-odd bulbs I planted in the autumn are beginning to bloom.

country jug

I came across a gorgeous jug and got it for a fiver at a country fair a year ago. I have been dreaming of making one inspired by it, ever since. I love its flamboyant curves and the elegant handle. My tall girl loves to fill it with her lemonade and edible flower concoctions. Just now it is holding more utensils that I must keep out of cupboards, where the mice still reign.

homemade jug © elisa rathje 2012

A raw clay jug, finished today, a study in reference to the country jug. It is a little more reserved and its spout was a struggle, but I think it should serve us well. One can never have too many pitchers, particularly on beautiful spring days like this one. Such a week of illness we’ve had, I’m keeping it simple as I’ve been devoting lots of time to helping the children feel better, and eating good, cleansing food. I hope to have some finished things to show you in April. In April! Have a lovely weekend.

(Update: If you loved these pitchers, have a nose around the shop, or if you’re in Victoria, BC, come by the lakeside studio & shop to see my latest work.)

quilting squares

Quilting Squares is our very first old school movie, a moving image tribute to patchwork quilting in the traditional nine-patch pattern. Get the pattern from the appleturnovershop.

Have you only a minute? Watch the preview.

lime stripe &formal flowers project kit

lime stripe &formal flowers patchwork project

quilting squares liberty petal & apples patchwork kit

liberty petal & apples patchwork project

quilting squares liberty floral project kit

quilting squares liberty floral patchwork project