herbal cough syrup

We like to forage for plants in early autumn that support our health through winter illnesses. A very timely medicinal harvest, like the nettles in spring. Some years I’ve made elderberry cordial, others, rosehip cordial. The following simple homemade herbal cough syrup includes both, plus hibiscus and honey for a delicious variation without refined sugar. If you can forage the ingredients fresh – brilliant! Luckily, the dried versions available at herbal shops are also great, so you can make this remedy anytime you need it.

My tall girl spotted elderberries growing just next door to our friend’s place, as we set off on a walk while our dried herbs were infusing!

We used dried elderberries. Add rosehips and hibiscus to these, about 1 part each to 2 parts elderberry.

Simmer these until very soft in just less than double the weight in water as you have in herbs. So, if you have 500g of herbs, use about 900ml of water.

Strain them through a scalded cloth. You can hang this to drain overnight if you like, to get every last bit.

Once the infusion has cooled, pour in raw honey – 1 part honey to 2 parts herbal infusion.

cough_syrup

Stir it up gently and store it in small, very clean bottles in the fridge til required! We take a spoonful when we feel a sore throat coming on.

(I reserve the stewed herbs to make an infused vinegar, too.) Stay well!

rosehip cordial

Last year we made a rosehip infusion, sweetened lightly with a little stevia, and used within a short time like you would fresh juice. This year we wanted to preserve rosehip cordial to use medicinally throughout the winter. Gathering rosehips to make a vitamin C-rich cordial was encouraged during wartime in Britain. We’re growing very fond of the tradition. We used a combination of rosehips, including apple roses like the ones Alÿs Fowler showed us. We’re so fond of nibbling round those fresh, but they were starting to go, so we hurried to collect a bowl of them.

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

Give the hips a rinse,

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

Then remove the stems. Aren’t they just gorgeous?

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

Chop them roughly. Keep in mind that the seeds are used for itching powder! You needn’t remove them though.

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

Toss them in a pot of boiling water using just less than double the volume of water as their weight – so if you have 400 grams of rosehips, use about 700ml of water. Bring it all to boil again, leave it to cool somewhat, and pour through a scalded cloth.

rosehip-5

Hang up your muslin or jelly bag full of rosehips and let them drip for a while, and repeat the whole process again. This time leave it to hang overnight.

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

Combine the infusions and measure them. The River Cottage Preserves recipe calls for 650 grams of sugar to about 1 litre of juice.

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

Slowly heat til the sugar is dissolved, then boil for a couple of minutes.

rosehip cordial © elisa rathje 2011

I sterilise my cordial bottles in the dishwasher and if I can’t time it well to have warm bottles ready, I fill them with hot water while they’re waiting, then quickly pour the water out just before ladling in the hot syrup and corking them. Preserves says to use within 4 months. This won’t be a problem over here. Sterilise in a water bath if you want to keep it longer, and keep refrigerated once opened. We love a couple of splashes of rosehip cordial in a glass of water and we’re very much looking forward to having it all through the cold seasons.

rosehip infusion

For a while now I’ve been neglecting a bucket of beautiful rosehips that our dear friend picked for us.

rosehips.jpg

Finally I filled the fridge with so much milk in anticipation of making mozzarella and had no room to keep them, so I turned them into rosehip cordial. Well, nearly. Sometimes I find we’ve really had enough of sugar and will trade off the pleasure of preserving for future use for the benefits of a sugar-free version. I made a rosehip infusion following a compilation of River Cottage Hedgerow and Preserves recipes, only I didn’t add sugar at the end to reduce into a syrup. We’ll need to use it in the next little while as a result, but then we need the vitamin C!

After bringing 800 ml of water to boil, I threw in the rosehips.

cooking-hips.jpg

They cooked for a while, til I could mash them against the side of the pot with a wooden spoon. I let them simmer a little longer, cooled, and strained through a jelly bag. Doubled muslin would work. Then I brought another 800 ml of water to boil and repeated the process, only this time I left it to hang overnight.

cooked-hips.jpg

I strained the two infusions through muslin one last time, and decanted into cordial bottles, to store in the fridge and use up in a few days. We’d never tried rosehip cordial before, oh! We’re enthralled with the flavour, sweetened with a few drops of stevia. It won’t last long around here.

rosehip-syrup.jpg

We’d like to go out in search of more hips to preserve in a cordial or a jelly, as there’s still a little of autumn to catch some.