wild sourdough culture

Naming your sourdough culture like a pet may a seem a little odd, but I’m hoping that it means we won’t forget to feed it. (I’ve set a reminder on the calendar just in case we neglect it anyway.) The children measured a cup of flour (we used whole spelt but will use rye in future, it works better) and a cup of warm water, into the jar, and stirred it. Take your time stirring in, as lots of air is a very good idea; the wild cultures are in the air around you. Tomorrow, and the next day, and possibly a dozen after that, we’ll feed the culture: we’ll toss out half (better yet, use it in baking, or pancakes!) and add half a cup of flour and the same or a little less in water.

wild sourdough culture

If brown liquid appears it isn’t such a good sign, but you can pour a little off or stir it in if it is dry, and plan to feed the culture more often for a bit. (A professional baker later told me you can feed it twice a day!) You want a scent like a fine beer brewing, rather than something going off, if you see what I mean.

When the culture starts to bubble, and is doubling in size, it is beginning to be ready, but could ideally use a couple of weeks of daily feeding. The best ritual is when you are removing half of it to bake with, and feeding the other half a little when you do, but for the home baker sometimes that isn’t possible. Better to culture and use a sourdough starter imperfectly than not at all, I say. After a couple of weeks, we’ll feed it every day if we are using it often; if not, it goes into the fridge to be fed once a week, and brought out and fed daily to get it back up to an energetic bubble again. Soon we can use it to start our first traditional slow sourdough. If we are really devoted, we can use this culture for our whole lives. The children named the wild sourdough culture Flower.

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p>Read more about sourdough culture over here, as I get more experienced with it!